« The Next Trend: Integrating PV with Solar Thermal | Main | Where's Western Wind Energy's Tax Grant? »


       

GE To Delay Colorado Thin-film Manufacturing Plant

Steve Leone

 bigstock-Airport-Flights-Screen-721623.jpg
Delays and cancellations photo via Bigstock

Now, energy giant General Electric (GE) said it is putting plans for its Aurora, Colo., plant on hold for 18 months in reaction to the continued drop in crystalline silicon solar panels. When the company announced its plans to jump into American thin-film manufacturing nine months ago, it did so in grand fashion. Company officials unveiled a plan for a 400-megawatt (MW) facility that would churn out cadmium telluride (CdTe) panels, the same thin-film technology deployed by Abound. It was an American manufacturing success story born out of Primestar, which GE purchased in 2011.

GE wasn’t preparing for a soft launch. It was pushing ahead hard and fast with the goal of becoming a U.S.-based solar manufacturing leader. To that end, it laid out a plan to introduce a module at 14 percent efficiency or higher and that the product would hit the commercial market by 2013. Now, company officials say they will delay the new plant so they can work on beefing up the efficiency. That was the same approach announced by Abound, when it said this winter that it would temporarily shut down its Colorado lines to work on efficiency. Four months later the company announced it would file for bankruptcy

So now, U.S. manufacturing has lost two of its biggest prizes — one a startup and the other an industry leader. In addition to the 400 MW the GE plant was to produce, it would also have created about 350 new jobs. The 640-MW plant that Abound received a Department of Energy loan guarantee to build in Tipton, Ind., represents another 1,000 jobs.

GE, to be sure, is a stable, diversified company. It also remains a player and investor in many renewable technologies. It’s proven to be a company willing to take a chance on technologies that it feels can win a significant segment of the market. Many will surely see the announcement as a lack of confidence in thin film going forward.

The company exuded confidence nine months ago, just as the industry was bracing for trade action against Chinese crystalline silicon panels that were driving down costs and profit margins for American manufacturers. 

“With so much capacity out there, the only companies that can compete are the ones with the right technology and the right cost structure,” said Matt Guyette, GE’s strategy leader for renewables, during a conference call last October. “There’s a lot of companies out there with the wrong cost structure. We see it with their quarterly reports and some of the bankruptcies in the past few months.

“We’ve been watching the space for over 10 years, and we’ve been investing in technologies, and the reason we have not built this plant before is that the technology was not at a point where we were confident that we could compete. We’re there now. We’re confident and we’re scaling up.” 

While the company is saying that it will forge ahead, the delay illustrates once again how rapidly the solar industry is changing.

Steve Leone is an Associate Editor at RenewableEnergyWorld.com.  He has been a journalist for more than 15 years and has worked for news organizations in Rhode Island, Maine, New Hampshire, Virginia and California.



was posted on AltEnergyStocks.com.


       

advertise here


Oil and Gas





Post a comment

(If you haven't left a comment here before, you may need to be approved by the site owner before your comment will appear. Until then, it won't appear on the entry. Thanks for waiting.)

Featured Companies











Oil and Gas


Search This Site


Subscribe to this Blog

Enter your email address:

Delivered by FeedBurner


Subscribe by RSS Feed



Twitter Headlines

Certifications and Site Mentions


New York Times

Wall Street Journal





USA Today

Forbes

The Scientist

USA Today

Seeking Alpha Certified

Twitter Updates